Electronic Painting / Digital Art

The Electronic Painting series constitutes an on-going examination of the essential formal, conceptual, and thematic elements of my work.

The formal aspects of the images are constructed with virtual means, through the use of Adobe Photoshop, in a way similar to the creation of electronic music. Rather than working the material aspects of the images I concentrate on the visual ones, which become materialized at the time of the printing. Brushes imported into Photoshop from the internet become my media. The resulting images are further combined, extending the series into an (almost) endless variation within the virtual realm.

Conceptually, the images are built as separated from the material support. This chasm, possible only with the relatively recent technological advances of the digital realm, brings with it a profound change in the way we think about images and art in general. Never before had the processes of material utilization and image-making been as conceptually separated as they are now. This series wants to call attention to this conceptual element through the construction of images with no material support.

Thematically the series is built around the topic of air, as an element and as a concept. Wings, smoke, empty areas, space as air, air as space, and space as seen from the air (via Google maps), incorporate images in a methonymic construction of meaning, and play with abstraction and figuration boundaries. Gallery III expands the themes to include wingless animals.

The works recognize Western influences, such as those from Franz Kline, Robert Rauschenberg, Mark Rothko, Brice Marden’s panels and glyphs, and Christopher Wool’s use of self-quotations. In a less obvious manner, the works are related to the “spatial concepts” of the Italian artists Lucio Fontana, Mario Sironi, and Giorgio Morandi. Artist from Latin America such as Zdravko Ducmelic, Alfredo Hlito, and Joaquín Torres-García’s concept of structure, contributed to the images. The series also recognizes an Oriental aspect to it, with renderings of Islamic-like symmetries, broken and put together again.

The final images are variable in sizes and in media. They can be printed on paper or canvas, up to a size of 44 inches-wide, as the needs of the installation dictate.

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CURRICULUM VITAE

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